Avoiding Fraud and Scams

April 21, 2021

In healthcare, professionals often need to focus on multiple dimensions of care and well-being for their patients and clients, including non-clinical types like finances. Financial abuse is an aspect of elder abuse that is not always addressed. According to data from the Department of Justice, 26% of reported cases involved financial exploitation. This is the second highest type of maltreatment in this reported data. It is important to recognize the signs that someone may be a victim of financial abuse and fraud. According to a PA Department of Aging study on financial exploitation, 'older adults are at an increased risk for financial exploitation due to health changes which occur during the natural aging process, as well as their steady income, accumulated wealth, and retirement savings over their lifespan." A healthcare professional may be one of the first to notice the health changes that could potentially make someone more vulnerable to financial exploitation. This may put the healthcare professional in the unique, and sometimes confusing, position of how to help a patient when the matter is not necessarily related to their healthcare. It is never for certain that the patient or client has an advocate who is looking out for his or her best interest. It is possible that those close to him or her may be taking financial advantage of the situation. According to the Department of Justice, "A financial loss to the older adult was slightly more likely to occur when the suspect was known (79%) compared to when the suspect was a stranger (75%)." Additionally, "of the 22 states submitting data on perpetrator relationship to victims ages 60 and older, over half had a kinship relationship with the victim." One goal of this program is to enlighten individuals to the fraud and scams that may impact patients and clients that the audience works with to provide information on help and resources addressing financial exploitation. By staying alert to common fraudulent techniques, professionals may be better prepared to share concerns and intervene when appropriate. Sources: https://www.justice.gov/elderjustice/eappa-data-overview; https://www.aging.pa.gov/publications/older-adults-financial-exploitation-study/Documents/PA%20Department%20of%20Aging%20%E2%80%93%20Financial%20Exploitation%20of%20Older%20Adults%20Study%20Report.pdf

 
 
 
 
 

Target Audience

Nurse

Social Worker

 
 
 
 

Learning Objectives

• Identify common scams that have the potential to impact physical, emotional, and psychosocial well-being of consumers/patients.

• Recognize the warning signs of a potential scam to be able to educate consumers/patients in avoiding falling victim to scams.

• Support consumers/patients with information on BBB free programs and resources to research companies, file disputes, and report scams.

 
 
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 ANCC
    UPMC Provider Unit is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation
  • 1.00 ASWB
  • 1.00 Attendance
Course opens: 
03/05/2021
Course expires: 
06/30/2021
Event starts: 
04/21/2021 - 1:00pm
Event ends: 
04/21/2021 - 2:00pm

In healthcare, professionals often need to focus on multiple dimensions of care and well-being for their patients and clients, including non-clinical types like finances. Financial abuse is an aspect of elder abuse that is not always addressed. According to data from the Department of Justice, 26% of reported cases involved financial exploitation. This is the second highest type of maltreatment in this reported data. It is important to recognize the signs that someone may be a victim of financial abuse and fraud. According to a PA Department of Aging study on financial exploitation, 'older adults are at an increased risk for financial exploitation due to health changes which occur during the natural aging process, as well as their steady income, accumulated wealth, and retirement savings over their lifespan." A healthcare professional may be one of the first to notice the health changes that could potentially make someone more vulnerable to financial exploitation. This may put the healthcare professional in the unique, and sometimes confusing, position of how to help a patient when the matter is not necessarily related to their healthcare. It is never for certain that the patient or client has an advocate who is looking out for his or her best interest. It is possible that those close to him or her may be taking financial advantage of the situation. According to the Department of Justice, "A financial loss to the older adult was slightly more likely to occur when the suspect was known (79%) compared to when the suspect was a stranger (75%)." Additionally, "of the 22 states submitting data on perpetrator relationship to victims ages 60 and older, over half had a kinship relationship with the victim." One goal of this program is to enlighten individuals to the fraud and scams that may impact patients and clients that the audience works with to provide information on help and resources addressing financial exploitation. By staying alert to common fraudulent techniques, professionals may be better prepared to share concerns and intervene when appropriate. Sources: https://www.justice.gov/elderjustice/eappa-data-overview; https://www.aging.pa.gov/publications/older-adults-financial-exploitation-study/Documents/PA%20Department%20of%20Aging%20%E2%80%93%20Financial%20Exploitation%20of%20Older%20Adults%20Study%20Report.pdf

 
 
 
 
 
UPMC Teams Meeting
Pittsburgh, PA
United States

Caitlin Driscoll

In support of improving patient care, the University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, University of Pittsburgh is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. University of Pittsburgh maintains responsibility for this course. Social workers completing this course receive 1.0 continuing education credits

 
 
 
 

Available Credit

  • 1.00 ANCC
    UPMC Provider Unit is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation
  • 1.00 ASWB
  • 1.00 Attendance
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