Mental Health Science: From a Curiosity about the “Imaginary World” to Applications in the “Real World"

Basic neuroscientific research on the mechanisms underlying cognitive, affective, and social processes have been slow in penetrating real-world psychology/psychiatry clinics. This is a missed opportunity for maximizing and advancing our understanding of core patterns of psychopathology and treatment response in neuropsychiatric disorders. This series will bring together members from the neuroscience, medical, and psychiatry/psychology communities to translate basic science findings into real-world clinical practice. 

The present webinar series will address this gap by bringing together members from the neuroscience, medical, and psychiatry/psychology communities to translate basic science findings into real-world clinical practice. The proposed interdisciplinary planning committee will identify speakers with an established record of advancing clinical principles and techniques based on the basic science of emotion, socioemotional development, learning, memory, attention, and reward. Thus, the webinar series will identify areas of synergy on an interprofessional healthcare team based on complementary expertise and training backgrounds.

Target Audience

This program was designed for physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, psychologists, and social workers. 

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Discuss the idea of mental health science
  • Share a curiosity about mental imagery
  • Explore how we might move from the lab to real world (and back again)

Suggested Additional Reading

  1. Holmes, E. A., Craske, M. G., & Graybiel, A. M. (2014). A call for mental-health science. Clinicians and neuroscientists must work together to understand and improve psychological treatments [Comment]. Nature, 511(7509), 287-289. doi: 10.1038/511287a
  2. Holmes, E. A., Ghaderi, A., Harmer, C., Ramchandani, P. G., Cuijpers, P., Morrison, A. P., Roiser, J. P., Bockting, C. L. H., O’Connor, R. C., Shafran, R., Moulds, M.L., & Craske, M. G. (2018). The Lancet Psychiatry Commission on Psychological Treatments Research in Tomorrow's Science. The Lancet Psychiatry, 5(3), 237-86. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(17)30513-8
  3. James, E. L., Bonsall, M. B., Hoppitt, L., Tunbridge, E. M., Geddes, J. R., Milton, A. L., & Holmes, E. A. (2015). Computer game play reduces intrusive memories of experimental trauma via reconsolidation update mechanisms. Psychological Science, 26(8), 1201-2015. doi: 10.1177/0956797615583071.
  4. Singh, L., Espinosa, L., Ji, J. L., Moulds, M. L., & Holmes, E. A. (2020). Developing thinking around mental health science: the example of intrusive, emotional mental imagery after psychological trauma. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 25, 348-363.
  5. Holmes, E. A., O'Connor, R. C., Perry, V. H., Tracey, I., Wessely, S., Arseneault, L., Ballard, C., Christensen, H., Cohen Silver, R., Everall, I., Ford, T., John, A., Kabir, T., King, K., Madan, I., Michie, S., Przybylski, A. K., Shafran, R., Sweeney, A., Worthman, C. M., Yardley, L., Cowan, K., Cope, C., Hotopf, M., Bullmore, E. (2020). Multidisciplinary research priorities for the COVID-19 pandemic: a call for action for mental health science. The Lancet Psychiatry, 7(6), 547–560. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(20)30168-1
  6. Kanstrup, M, Singh, L., Göransson, K., Widoff, J. Taylor, R., Iyadurai, L. Mould, M, Holmes, E. A., (2021). Reducing Intrusive Memories After Trauma via a Brief Cognitive Task Intervention in the Hospital Emergency Department: an Exploratory Randomised Controlled Pilot Trial. Translational Psychiatry, 11: Article 30. doi: 10.1038/s41398-020-01124-6. https://osf.io/nma5q/
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
    The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • 1.00 ANCC
    UPMC Provider Unit is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation
  • 1.00 Attendance
Course opens: 
04/23/2021
Course expires: 
04/23/2024

Presenter:

Emily Holmes, PhD, DClinPsych - Professor in Psychology at the Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden. She is also affiliated to the Karolinska Institutet’s Department of Clinical Neuroscience.

Planning Committee: 

Greg Siegle, PhD
Angela Fang, PhD
Judy Callan, PhD, RN
Rudi De Raedt, PhD
Ryan Jane Jacoby, Ph.D.
Maria Kryza-Lacombe, PhD
Andrew Peckham, PhD
Marlene Strege,PhD
Michael Thase, MD

Conflict of Interest Disclosure:

Dr. Holmes is on the Board of Trustees, Charity "MQ:Tranforming mental health through research."  She has two books (OUP, Guilford Press) on mental imagery in psychological therapy.  Held funding from sources including the Royal Society, Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, ESRC, NIHR.   Receives current funding from Lupina Foundation, Oak Foundation and Swedish Research Council (VR) AFA Försäkring.  Dr. Holmes provides occasional psychological therapy training workshops and is a member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Jacoby receives grant/research support from the National Institute of Mental Health under award number K23 MH120351. In the last year she has also received salary and research support from the International OCD Foundation, the Charles A. King Trust Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program (Bank of America, N.A., Co-Trustees), the Harvard University Mind Brain Behavior Initiative, the Harvard University Department of Psychiatry Livingston Fellowship Award, and the Harvard University Pershing Square Fund for Research on the Foundations of Human Behavior. Dr. Jacoby has received salary support from Telefonica Alpha, Inc. She is paid as a faculty member of the Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Academy. She also receives book royalties from Hogrefe Publishing.

Dr. Packham receives research support from NIH, McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

No other planners, members of the planning committee, speakers, presenters, authors, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Disclaimer Statement

The information presented at this CME program represents the views and opinions of the individual presenters, and does not constitute the opinion or endorsement of, or promotion by, the UPMC Center for Continuing Education in the Health Sciences, UPMC / University of Pittsburgh Medical Center or Affiliates and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.  Reasonable efforts have been taken intending for educational subject matter to be presented in a balanced, unbiased fashion and in compliance with regulatory requirements. However, each program attendee must always use his/her own personal and professional judgment when considering further application of this information, particularly as it may relate to patient diagnostic or treatment decisions including, without limitation, FDA-approved uses and any off-label uses.

 

In support of improving patient care, the University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The maximum number of hours awarded for this Continuing Nursing Education activity is 1.0 contact hours.

Other health care professionals will receive a certificate of attendance confirming the number of contact hours commensurate with the extent of participation in this activity.

All presenters disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above.  No other planners, members of the planning committee, speakers, presenters, authors, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

 

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
    The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • 1.00 ANCC
    UPMC Provider Unit is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation
  • 1.00 Attendance
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